Heat Exhaustion – Part 2 (Memorial Day Weekend)

Heat Exhaustion

With many headed to the beaches and/or pools this Memorial Day weekend, it is imperative to know the signs of heat exhaustion. In case you have missed it, click on this link (heat exhaustion). Basically I want to provide you with a helpful list so that you can be careful:

 

  • Hydrate with water or coconut water, especially if you will be drinking alcohol.

 

  • Don’t forget to reapply your sunscreen AFTER you spend time in the water. So many of you know this, but don’t do it for whatever reason and end up with huge painful sunburn.

 

  • And again, know the difference between having heat exhaustion and having a heat stroke. Heat strokes are more serious and acquire medical attention.

 

  • If you plan to play volleyball or other sports on the beach, be sure to drink proper hydrating fluids about every 30 mins. Remember high humidity will continue to zap the moisture from your body despite temperature readings.

 

  • A cooler with fruit is always beneficial and refreshing; apples, oranges, pears, grapes, melons etc. Those are also great snacks right before grilling or eating the heavy stuff.

 

Tip 1: Wet Towels. Place wet hand towels and/or washcloths in a cooler. Therefore if you get too hot or just want something cold and refreshing on your body, just reach in the cooler. The hand towel is great for applying around your neck or across the forehead…..or anywhere you see fit. Don’t forget to WET it before placing in the cooler. It works best when some of the ice is melted in the cooler also.

Tip 2: Steer clear of rip currents. Depending on what coast you plan to go to, you may be dealing with rip currents. When I was about 6 years of age, I was caught in a rip current. I was playing on the seashore right where the waves were breaking. At one time I had my back turned because the waves appeared to be getting higher and splashing in my eyes. And that’s when it happened. A huge wave came about at my head and knocked me down. Everything happened so incredibly fast. It was like suction underneath the waters pulling me. My eyes were wide open, and I remember seeing the sand swirling around and looking murky. Then it stopped…it was like all of a sudden the ocean got still. I could not swim, so I just wade to my left. (I was thinking that I just wanted to get out of that area) My feet could not reach the bottom without my head going under. So, I held my breath to touch the bottom with my feet and propelled myself forward and sideways, while popping my head back up to the surface for air. (Though I could not swim, I wasn’t knew to large body of water) The waves were helping me at that point. I kept going to my left and forward. Everyone on the beach looked so tiny; I could not make out my family. I knew I just needed to get back to shore. When I finally made it back, some people asked among themselves, “Where did she come from?” I remember asking for my mother. I was disoriented. At that point I didn’t know where to go and I was tired. Then my parents came down the beach with the people that were sunbathing near them all panicky and hysterical. This man said that he was going to swim out to get me, but he could not find me. He said in a frustrated way that he kept looking to find me, but he just could not find me. My father is a swimmer and could not find me either. And a woman said that she saw me playing with the waves she closed her eyes and then heard a loud crash, looked up and I was gone! Now we must remember that at that time rip currents were not talked about as much if at all. I think the mid to late nineties was when it was talk about more often. Even the tide wasn’t a concerning factor then. Once again, this is one of those events that I remember like it was yesterday, though I don’t think about it often. Later at another time, my father helped me get back in the ocean via walking way out deep parallel to the shore for a while. That was a transition period for me. Though I had gained respect for the sea, I was not terrified.

If you get caught in a rip current…do not try to swim against it. Wade or swim parallel to the shore and slowly make your way back! I can’t stress that enough!!

Tip 3: If you are traveling via road, try not to make split second decisions. Otherwise you may end up with a bill in the mail. Lol.      (GPS aren’t always accurate)

This Memorial Day weekend….Have a safe holiday folks. ;-)

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